CN : China ranks third in worldwide wind energy

Published on Alternative energy  |  January 4, 2010, 12:05

China has become in 2009 the third worldwide wind energy provider, announced the official New China press agency.

As the Asian giant tries to limit its dependence on carbon energy, the installed wind power capacity reached 20 GW at the end of 2009, declared Shi Lishan, vice-president of the Renewable Energy Department from the National Energy Administration.

Thus, according to the source, China took over Spain and positioned itself on the third place, behind USA and Germany.

At the end of 2008, USA had an installed capacity of 25.2 GW (20.8% of the worldwide capacity), Spain 16.8 GW and China 12.2 GW, according to official Chinese statistics.

The Chinese progress is far superior to the world evolution. The installed power has doubled in 2008 for the fourth consecutive year.

"In terms of scale and rhythm, the development of wind energy in China is absolutely unparalleled in the world", said last month Steve Sawyer, secretary general of the Global Wind Energy Council (GWEC). "If they maintain the current trend they will be the first in the world in terms of installed capacity at the end of 2011", he added.

China, world’s top greenhouse emission pollutant, intends to increase its national percentage of renewable energy from 9 % in 2009 up to 15 % in 2020. For comparison, the 20 % target is also EU’s goal for 2020.

China has recently renewed its support for renewable energy. The permanent committee of the National People’s Assembly has passed e revised law that requires the energy distribution companies to purchase all the electricity produced by the renewable energy sector.

Approximately 70 % of the Chinese energy production relies on the very polluting carbon-based technology. China, the third worldwide economic power with a growth rate of 8% in 2009, has recently came under harsh criticism at the UN climate change summit in Copenhagen for having hindered the adoption of an official document mandating greenhouse emission reductions.


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